September 13, 2010

Mellow Curves and Illumination

We did not arrive in or leave from Rome by train the last time I was there, but we needed a post office and the nearest one to our hotel was in Roma Termini, the city's central railway station. I'm glad we went there; the post office is located in the marvelous and newly renovated 1930s Mazzoni-designed wing of the building. 

We entered the Yellow Mezzanine directly from Via Giolitti and I was immediately struck by the appealing lines and shapes of the ceiling. Then this ceramic wall art captured my attention.

Rome, 2007

Next I saw how soothing the indirect lighting was, followed by the light fixture designs themselves. I was able to take these two additional photos of the brick portico ceiling and arches before a security officer came up to me to tell me to stop.



I have since learned that the fixtures were designed by British light designer Miles Pinninger and were produced by the award winning German company Franz SILL that in recent years has provided the lighting for many significant public spaces. This did surprise me some because Italy has its own strong designers and manufacturers in the lighting industry, but I would guess that SILL's reflector technology won the day.

Visit Mellow Yellow Monday for more takes on the color YELLOW.

15 comments:

Kay L. Davies said...

Your photos are always so interesting, Francisca. Thank you so much!

Kay
Alberta, Canada

Lesley said...

Pity security does not permit photographing these gorgeous interiors.

cieldequimper said...

I like train stations as long as they don't happen to be a daily routine thingy...

Liz said...

Beautiful photos. TFS!

Happy MYM.

Liz @ MLC

VP said...

The next time I'm in Rome I'll check this place, it looks very interesting...

Evelyn said...

Love the last shot - it pulls me in..

Greyscale Territory said...

A beautiful, fascinating looking building! Love the range of subdued colour tones and ceiling shapes!

RNSANE said...

I've been to Rome for the past two years to celebrate my birthday...never made it to the train station, however, but I see I should have. It's quite lovely. I'm not sure I'll ever get back since my job of 21 years ended in massive budget cuts eighteen months ago!

jabblog said...

How strange that photographs are not allowed inside a post office! What secrets does it hold? I enjoyed the photos you managed to take, though :-)

EG Wow said...

I'm glad the guard didn't make you erase the photos! (I had that happen to me once,) This is such an interesting place.

Kaori said...

The various shades of yellow and the way you captured the arches are wonderful! Security seems tight though...

Ann said...

Why did you need a post office?

Can you believe me when I am not making this up?

I was thinking of my Australia Friend Neville whom I met through our work for the Deaf International. I was thinking of Neville because he had been ill and I was exchanging with another blogger about my work with the Deaf in Kenya today.

To make the story short, my most to do with Neville "WAS DRIVING HIM TO THE NEAREST SHOPPING MALL" and telling him 'WHERE THE POST OFFICE IS."

How canny is that?

http://annkschin.blogspot.com/2008/11/charity-to-deaf-in-kenya-foodsale.html

JM said...

These are some great perspectives! Well done.

Louis la Vache said...

Very interesting - «Louis'» eye would be drawn to these light fixtures, too. He likes the geometry of the shots of the arches and light fixtures. His normal subject matter rarely affords the opportunity for him to get shots like these.

joco said...

You've managed to turn 3-dimensional functionality into 2-dimensional art.
Those colours and shapes are unexpectedly satisfying. Who'd have thought a station could be that beautiful.